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CAVAZZA Veneto, Italy

The story of Cavazza begins in 1928 when Giovanni Cavazza purchased a house and vineyard in Selva di Montebello Vicentino.  At the beginning of the 20th century no one lived just for wine. Fruit, vegetables and tobacco were a big part of household budgets. For as far as the eyes could see, were rows and rows of mulberry trees. 

After World War II, the family acquired around 100 acres in the Gambellara zone, one of the unique areas of Italy with a volcanic origin. A post-war boom reenergized Italy, and with it, the land. Stables and barns were out: winemaking was in. A breath of modernism entered as the tractor replaced the horse, the quaint hand press become a more modern hydraulic press. Modernization and innovation continued through the decades and over generations. In 1995 the first steps were taken towards a focus on environmental sustainability, which lends additional authenticity to their product, while channeling the deep connection to the land that Giovanni Cavazza always had.

One cannot exploit the fruits of the land without respecting the ground from which they came from. This is why the winery, in an experimental project, began to drastically reduce the use of sulfites in their wines. This experiment continues today, with patient research of high end, natural wine products. 

 
 Veneto, Italy

Veneto, Italy

Region & Vineyard Notes

 Selva di Montebello Vicentino

Selva di Montebello Vicentino

The Durello vineyards are found in Monti Lessini (or Lessini for short), a DOC of north-eastern Italy's Veneto wine region. Created in 1987 and revived in 2001, the Monti Lessini title is a classic example of the modern northern Italian DOC. While its neighbors Valpolicella, Soave and Bardolino cover one core style, Monti Lessini offers reds, whites, blends, varietals, foaming spumante (both white and pink) and sweet passito nectars made from dried grapes. The production zone is of volcanic origin. The hills on which the vines grow are layers of rocks formed by lava flows. The soil is dark, stony and rich in minerals and fossil deposits. Volcanic soils are rich in substances that are nutritional for the vines, and also act as a natural barrier for any diseases in the soil. For these reasons viticulture on volcanic soils calls for little external intervention and is extremely well suited for sustainable cultivation.