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IRONWORKS DISTILLERY     Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

Based in the historic port town of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia (home to the famous Bluenose Schooners) partners Pierre Guevremont and Lynne MacKay opened Ironworks Distillery in 2010. The couple started with a desire to make a handcrafted product that was uniquely connected to the Maritimes. They purchased a copper wood-burning still and found a home for it in a 19th-century former marine blacksmith’s shop, which inspired the distillery name. They make small batches of their unique vodka, gins, rums, brandies, and liqueurs using Nova Scotia fruit and botanicals.

ironworksdistillery.com

 

Lynn and Pierre

Lynn and Pierre

The Blacksmith shop that inspired the name and is now home to Ironworks.

The Blacksmith shop that inspired the name and is now home to Ironworks.

Nova Scotia, Canada

Nova Scotia, Canada

 

The Region

Framed by two parallel mountain ranges along the Bay of Fundy, the Annapolis Valley enjoys a microclimate which provides relatively mild temperatures for the region and, coupled with the fertile glacial sedimentary soils on the valley floor, is ideal for growing a wide range of vegetable and fruit crops. Particularly famous for its apple crop, the valley hosts in excess of 1,000 farms of various types, the majority being relatively small family-owned operations.

 Ironworks has developed an extensive network of farmers exclusively within Nova Scotia from which they buy products.  Their cranberries travel a mere 8 kilometers from bog to the distillery and no fruit travels more than 150 kilometers to the facility.  Apples, pears, grapes, raspberries, blueberries are bountiful in Nova Scotia and they use them all. Even their Saskatoon Berries are sourced locally.  Since sugar cane does not grow in Nova Scotia, at least not yet, they use Crosby’s molasses, imported from Guatemala and processed in New Brunswick, for their award winning Rum.